Travel & Design Blog - BY YASMIN METZ-JOHNSON

Saturday, 27 August 2016

SERPENTINE PAVILION BY BJARKE INGELS GROUP



Since the year 2000, the Serpentine Galleries have commissioned an internationally renowned architect to design the Serpentine Pavilion. I have documented the past three pavilions here on my blog. The sixteenth serpentine pavilion is by the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG). Bjarke Ingels is a Danish Architect who is known for projects such as the Vancouver House. BIG have created something extraordinary with no more than three materials to construct the temporary structure. The structure consists of three elements only, the fiberglass frames, aluminum profiles and wooden base and furnishings.



As I approached the installation I couldn’t help but noticed its fragile state, its resemblance to a grand scale paper craft from a far. Using the idea and foundations of a brick wall, by pulling the multiple frames apart according to Ingels he explains the architecture creates “an undulating cliff side” and the interior opens in the form of a cave canyon. I found the repetition of one form to be intriguing as it created multiple profiles, the shape and section of the facade evolved as I walked around the exterior of the pavilion. Whereas the interior gave the user of the space a shell effect where natural lighting seeps through the square forms. The two walls intertwine and merge into one to create an interlocking shelter similar to the aesthetics of a cave. Meanwhile within this space included the annual kiosk and café space and the public.


As I approached the installation I couldn’t help but noticed its fragile state, its resemblance to a grand scale paper craft from a far. Using the idea and foundations of a brick wall, by pulling the multiple frames apart according to Ingels he explains the architecture creates “an undulating cliff side” and the interior opens in the form of a cave canyon. I found the repetition of one form to be intriguing as it created multiple profiles, the shape and section of the facade evolved as I walked around the exterior of the pavilion. Whereas the interior gave the user of the space a shell effect where natural lighting seeps through the square forms. The two walls intertwine and merge into one to create an interlocking shelter similar to the aesthetics of a cave. Meanwhile within this space included the annual kiosk and café space and the public.


I found that the simplicity of BIG’s worked and the contrast in materials worked well visually. I particularly like how the public seating has been integrated into the design scheme. Not to mention the layout along the interior sides of the installation that enhances the space inventing a contemporary pavilion for the Serpentine Galleries. 





This year, the Serpentine have extended their annual summer pavilion with the addition of ‘Summer Houses’. Despite them being located within close proximity to the main Pavilion I didn’t have the time to go and see them for myself. However I have listed the four architects and their projects below. These projects are spaced around South Kensington and Hyde Park area of London, UK. If you can’t see them all you must see at least one, its not every year we have five pavilions/summer houses to choose from!



Photos by YASMIN TELLS
The Serpentine Pavilion and the Summer Houses 2016 will be available to view until mid October.






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